The Irish Crime Week Giveaway!

Following the Roddy Doyle giveaway last week (which was won by Col at The Only Way is Reading), this week I have a crime related prize up for grabs!

 

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Photo: DRB Images

 

As I’m going to be spending the week reading and reviewing Irish Crime Fiction, I’m offering one lucky winner signed copies of Eoin McNamee’s Blue is the Colour and Stuart Neville’s The Final Silence, along with a rather nifty tote bag from Northern Ireland’s greatest bookshop – No Alibis (where both these books were bought!)

Blue is the Night (taken from Eoin McNamee’s website)

1949. Lance Curran is set to prosecute a young man for a brutal murder, in the ‘Robert the Painter’ case, one which threatens to tear society apart. In the searing July heat, corruption and justice vie as Harry Ferguson, Judge Curran’s fixer, contemplates the souls of men adrift, and his own fall from grace with the beautiful and wilful Patricia. Within three years, Curran will be a judge, his nineteen year old daughter dead, at the hands of a still unknown murderer, and his wife Doris condemned to an asylum for the rest of her days.

In Blue is the Night, it is Doris who finally emerges from the fog of deceit and blame to cast new light into the murder of her daughter – as McNamee once again explores and dramatizes a notorious and nefarious case.

 

 

The Final Silence (taken from Stuart Neville’s website)

Rea Carlisle has inherited a house from an uncle she never knew. It doesn’t take her long to clear out the dead man’s remaining possessions, but one room remains stubbornly locked. When Rea finally forces it open she discovers inside a chair, a table – and a leather-bound book. Inside its pages are locks of hair, fingernails: a catalogue of victims.

Horrified, Rea wants to go straight to the police but when her family intervene, fearing the damage it could cause to her father’s political career, Rea turns to the only person she can think of: DI Jack Lennon. But Lennon is facing his own problems. Suspended from the force and hounded by DCI Serena Flanagan, the toughest cop he’s ever faced, Lennon must unlock the secrets of a dead man’s terrifying journal.

 

To be in wih a chance to win these books from two of Ireland’s greatest crime writers, simply comment below or retweet this post. Rules are the same as last week’s giveaway and the competition will close at 6pm on Saturday!

Good luck!

 

Giveaway Ireland Month

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Cathy746books View All →

I am a 40 something book buying addict trying to reduce the backlog one book at a time!

31 Comments Leave a comment

  1. There is no doubt that there’s a lot of exciting things happening in Irish fiction and it really looks like Irish Crime Fiction will be the next big thing in publishing. I would be delighted to read and receive these books!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Both books seem really intriguing! I love crime fiction but I never had the chance to read it by Irish authors. Thank you for this post and for the giveaway 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve been getting into Irish crime fiction, it really has a great unique vibe. The stock standard stuff is boring now, so it’s great to be reading some lesser known crime writers. Both of these books sound amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I so rarely read crime fiction, but it’s not because the books don’t sound good. I think I worry that they are formulaic, even though I know they can’t all be. I just need to find out who the good authors are, maybe. These ones sound good!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, wouldn’t this be the best way to see if you like them?! If you want any recommendations, let me know. I didn’t read ANY crime until about 8 years ago because I thought it would all be formulaic (and it can be) but now I love it!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I think I was the other one! I have The Twelve by Stuart Neville, and I want Ratlines as it sounds brilliant but, like you, I’m not (meant to be) buying books at the mo! (Although I popped into the charity shop round the corner a couple of days ago and there was a ton of crime fiction in, from Margery Allingham to all the No Nesbo, Henning Mankell, and Michael Connelly collections, plus other bits and bobs! I bought a Per Wahloo/Maj Sjowall and a James Oswald – at 50p each it’d be rude not to!) Looks like Scottish crime writers need to be looking over their shoulders – the Irish are coming! Celtic Noir will be trumping Tartan Noir! Best prize ever, I’m crossing EVERYTHING!

        Like

  5. Irish crime fiction just in time for St. Patrick’s Day. If I don’t win, I’ll try to find these at a local bookstore or library. I’ve loved American crime fiction since I was a kid. Now I’m branching out and discovering non-American authors.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I’m catching up on all of your excellent posts celebrating Irish writing. I’m particularly fond of your previous one on the Irish crime writers! I just had a friend recommend a Tana French novel, which is anxiously awaiting me at the holds desk at my library. I’ve been trying to add more Irish, Welsh, and Scottish books into my diet recently, and all of your coverage of Irish authors is perfectly timed. Looking forward to more to come this month.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I clearly don’t read enough Irish crime novels. These sound really interesting. I’m thinking this might be a genre I need to get into more often.

    Like

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